Sofitel, Oh Sofitel Macau at Ponte 16!

2015/01/img_0075.jpgThis is the higher-end sibling of Novotel–both being among the 13 brands owned by the Accor Group.

I stayed at Sofitel Macau at Ponte 16, which was a walking distance from the Macau historic center, a Unesco World Heritage site. Taxi from the Macau Ferry Terminal cost 40 MOP, but I should have known that like most major hotels in this gambling city, Sofitel also had its own free shuttle bus–which I eventually took the next morning to catch my ferry ride back to Hong Kong.

With the tagline, “Life is Maqnifique!”, Sofitel seeks to exude French luxury–thus the L’Occitane and Hermes toiletries. However there was a policy that restricted guests to only one extra set of these branded bathroom amenities–I am not sure if it applies only to this Sofitel, and if it applies to guests who stay more than two nights, for example.

That aside, service was pleasant and efficient, albeit lacking in warmth, I felt. Perhaps that was just because my time there was so brief–checking in late afternoon, and off the next morning by 10 am. There was a casino which I didn’t bother visiting, and a cafe and bar which my sister and I found a bit too hot and stuffy. The pub was playing loud music, with people playing darts and foosball, and a heavy smell of cigarette smoke–it reminded me of the clubbing scene during my college days and seemed out of place in a hotel like this. So we decided not to bother about drinks and just went back to our room.

2015/01/img_0084.jpgThe hotel itself gave an impression of luxury and grandeur at first glance, when we first stepped into the lobby to find ourselves going ‘wow’ over the glittery, gigantic Christmas deco–think life-sized reindeer and life-sized statue of an old man depicting, I believed, one of the three wise men on the night Jesus was born. And of course, fake snow. It was a visual feast that quickly lost its appeal instead of growing on me.

So it was tacky in my opinion, but since this was Macau, the lack of subtlety was probably an intent rather than an accident. It is, after all, known as Asia’s flashiest city. I am not quite sure what French luxury stands for, but I have a feeling Sofitel Macau at Ponte 16 reflects its host country more than the one of its origin.

2015/01/img_0059.jpgEnough about the tackiness of Macau–how a rich, old world heritage ended up coexisting with such loudness is another post altogether. But I must say that having made it only to Senado Square at night, and one of its famous biscuit and pastry shops, Macau continues to intrigue me after I have left–like a mysterious stranger whose quiet charm I cannot deny after a brief encounter. I have a feeling I will be back in an attempt to understand it more.

2015/01/img_0101.jpgMeanwhile, back to the hotel–Sofitel Ponte No. 16, in a nutshell, has all the trappings of a five star establishment. Comfort, cleanliness and prettiness. But its attempt to be sophisticated is overshadowed by all the tack–and at the end of the day I actually prefer the four star sibling hotel I stayed in the following night, Novotel Citygate Hong Kong. It was supposed to be a lesser hotel by star rating and price, but I found the Novotel to be elegant, sleek and unassuming.

Maybe it’s the location rather than the hotels themselves. Maybe Macau is trying too hard to differentiate herself from Hong Kong, the fast and sophisticated metropolitan neighbor. Another post for another day!

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